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SURVIVOR: a summary of the book

This story is about one woman’s courage to overcome domestic violence, school bullying and other related issues of abuse. The story presents the leading character as a resilient woman who is determined not to let this evil destroy her. Instead, she builds up the courage to walk away even when the perpetrator was determined to destroy her.  This was one personal battle she had to win.

In the first chapter the reader’s journey through domestic violence, as evidenced from childhood, denotes eye witness accounts of savage beatings inflicted on her mother, by the ruthless hands of a brutal and domineering father. He relied on violence as a tool to engender fear within the household.

In yet another scenario relating to her ex-partner, she was tormented day and night, making her life a living hell. In real terms, the author was faced with a spiritual review of her life through ardent and sincere prayer. From this emerged a clear commitment to embark on a 21-day fast in order to re-start her life on new ground – to emigrate.

The aim of this book is to shed light on circumstances of abuse and also a self-help tool for those who need something to draw upon for strength. Domestic violence has been swept under the carpet for too long and has caused families to suffer. Men and women experience domestic violence; some have lost their lives. Others are left suffering from mental health-related issues. I am grateful to God that I have emerged, not as a victim, but as someone who has overcome and is now willing to bring awareness through my story to empower others who need that push.

Another aim of Survivor is to bring out factors which others may well identify within the realm of personal experiences. In the same breath, I am encouraging us to have the courage to take positive actions by addressing these issues as and when they surface.

Whilst maintaining the right to be silent, some may choose to remain the sufferers. Suffering in silence is certainly not the best course of action. One therapeutic course of action for me was that of constructing my thoughts around the preparation of a manuscript for a book. A discussion forum might well follow.

 One may ask if domestic violence is a legacy that a father chooses to leave with his children; especially his sons? Not all children will emulate the negative example of a brutal dad. Some will choose to make wise choices but what about the others who haven’t got the will power to adapt? Let us all work together to eradicate this evil that is not only destroying families but generation after generation!

Carrol Rowe